Google is facing a first-of-its kind consumer fraud lawsuit in Arizona, though experts are unsure how successful the lawsuit will be.

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Source: Search Engine Roundtable


Kamala Harris did THAT. She, a black and South Asian woman, sat on that stage for 90 minutes and reminded the nation, especially Mike Pence, that she deserves to be in the global political arena and to be the Vice President of the United States.

Kamala Harris sat through interruptions, mansplaining, and a moderator who failed (and didn’t try very hard) to keep Mike Pence in line. And as the debate continued, tweets like this skyrocketed in likes and retweets:

Tweet about Kamala Harris
Tweet about Kamala Harris


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Source: NBC Asian America

Yesterday, NBC Asian America published an article titled “Rep. Judy Chu: How to talk about China’s role in pandemic in racially sensitive way.” The article reports that Rep. Judy Chu (D-Calif), chair of the Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus, released a “toolkit” for fellow lawmakers to “push back on rising anti-Asian bias, offering suggestions on how to discuss China’s role in the pandemic.” …


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Source: ResearchGate

Many social movements, non-profit organizations, and philanthropic endeavors frame their work from a deficit-based approach, especially when their work surrounds issues of identity and inequality. A deficit-based approach is focused on filling a need, fixing a problem, resourcing the underresourced. It asks the question “What is missing that we must go find?” Contrary to a deficit-based approach is an asset-based approach, which is focused on creating opportunity and leveraging the strengths of a community. It asks the question “What is present that we can build upon?”

For example, consider a non-profit organization that provides workshops and trainings in corporate settings on gender equity in the workplace. A deficit-based mission statement for this non-profit might read something like this: “X organization provides interactive workshops to eradicate inequity and microaggressions that are currently widespread against women and other genders in the workforce.” An asset-based mission statement for this non-profit might say: “X organization engages professional communities to empower their non-male employees and create equitable and just workplace environments.” …


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A much-discussed issue in Silicon Valley is gentrification. The effects of the growing tech bubble on the Bay Area’s culture and more permanent populations have been the subject of academic analysis, popular news coverage, and casual conversation alike. I, like many others, have seen it play out in front of my own eyes.

I’ve written about the observations I’ve made about the divide between profitable downtown tech companies and the populations I work with (Title 1 middle schools in South San Francisco). A recent experience I had at work only affirmed those observations.

As I’ve mentioned before, the organization I work for partners with companies and Title 1 middle schools to expose students to careers in their city. In December, we’re approached by one of those corporate partners, a prominent tech company in downtown San Francisco which shall remain nameless out of (ironic) professionalism — let’s just call it Company A — to facilitate a 2-hour volunteer event at the end of January for their employees during a company retreat. They call it a Hackathon, popular in tech culture as a sprint-like innovation competition to develop and finish a software project in a truncated period of time (usually 24 hours or less) that targets a specific problem. They want to do a Hackathon of sorts with some of the students we work with, helping them to work on a project that solves a problem they are interested in. …


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On Thursday, January 2, 2020, Iranian general Qassem Soleimani was killed in an airstrike ordered by President Trump near Baghdad airport. The Pentagon confirmed the attack, writing that Soleimani was “actively developing plans to attack American diplomats and service members in Iraq and throughout the region” (NPR).

The timeline leading up to the fatal airstrike provides a fuzzy glimpse into the reasoning behind it. On Friday, December 27, militia group Kataib Hezbollah, which has ties to Iran, attacked the K1 military base near Kirkuk, Iraq, killing an American contractor and wounding several Iraqi and American personnel. Trump responded with a series of airstrikes on December 29 in sections of Iraq and Syria where members of Kataib Hezbollah are reportedly located. On December 31, Iraqi supporters of the militia group stormed the US embassy in Baghdad; violence ensued. …


An Ode to Diane Nguyen, my “Bojack Horseman” Spirit Animal and Fellow Angry Liberal

The Vietnamese-American ghost writer, blogger, and social media extraordinaire (give or take) from the popular Netflix series “Bojack Horseman,” whose final episodes will premiere at the end of January on the streaming platform, is one of two humans in the cast of primary characters in a show filled with anthropomorphic animals. And yet, despite her not being an animal, she is my spirit animal. And not only that, but she changed me for the better.

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The major characters of “Bojack Horseman”: Diane Nguyen, Mr. Peanutbutter, Bojack Horseman, Princess Carolyn, and Todd Chavez

Diane Nguyen, like all of the major characters on the show, is well fleshed out. She is dynamic with distinguishable flaws and strengths that sometimes blend together so much that you can’t tell which is which. Sometimes she succeeds and sometimes she fails, and sometimes you’re not sure which category she’s falling into. The show subverts traditional narrative, and as a result, the storyline and themes eerily resemble real life more than a television show, where everything is wrapped up nicely, whether it be happily or sadly. “Bojack Horseman” consistently leaves you with the feeling that there will be more to come, that the story isn’t over, for better or for worse — much like real life. …


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Source: New York Times

“Claire, why are there no black people who work here?”

I got this question last week from a 12-year-old African American girl who participates in the after school program I work for. We take our students on field trips to companies in their city, where they get to tour the company, meet some of the employees, and participate in a skill-building workshop facilitated by our program staff. In San Francisco, the vast majority of companies my organization partners with are tech companies, the most notable of which are Google, Facebook, and Salesforce.

My organization only works with Title 1 schools, and the vast majority of the students I work with across three different schools in South San Francisco are either African American or Hispanic. So when this 12-year-old girl asked me why there were no black people who work at the company we were visiting that day, my heart sank. I scrambled to find an answer. How could I explain gentrification and systemic racism to a middle schooler in 30 seconds? A million things were running through my head. The massively profitable tech giants my program was bringing the students to directly contribute to the racial, financial, and cultural changes San Francisco continues to experience. I am also a person of significant privilege –white passing on many occasions, educated, born into a comfortable socio-economic class. Am I the most effective person to answer this question? I could easily jumble the explanation of such complex systems that it may come across as confusing, or worse, offensive. …


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Source: CBS News

I went to Berkeley. That sentence alone already contains some implications about who I am as a person. Probably very progressive, probably angry about the various forms of injustice that plague our society, probably very self-righteous and opinionated and cares a lot about respecting people’s preferred pronouns. And I hereby admit: all those things are, in fact, true about me. I came from a very small, very conservative community in Arizona. So conservative that when I made the mistake of vocalizing my pro-choice viewpoints to my 9th grade classmates, one girl told me she hated me and could never respect my opinion. Naturally, growing up liberal in a community like that will breed some anger and resentment. Then I went to Berkeley for college and found a community that essentially held amplified versions of the viewpoints I had held all my life. …


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I have just completed my Bachelor’s Degree in Philosophy at UC Berkeley (hence my sparing posting on this blog — though I promise now we’re back to once a week!). I wrote a 45-page honors thesis on abortion morality, read hundreds of pages of papers and texts, wrote hundreds of pages of papers and texts, sat in lectures delivered by the best of the best, and discussed contentious issues with the brightest students. But of course, like the true philosopher I hope that I am, I noticed other things outside of the books my head was buried in.

Let’s read that sentence again: of course, like the true philosopher I hope that I am, I noticed other things outside of the books my head was buried in. …

About

Claire Newfeld

Philosophy grad, lawyer in training. I write about society, politics, and the human experience, mostly based on reflections of my own humble life.

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